L ART DE LA SUPERCHERIE KEVIN MITNICK PDF

Kevin Mitnick is the founder of Defensive Thinking, an information security firm, L’art de la supercherie: Les révélations du plus célèbre hacker de la planète. Buy L’art de la supercherie by Kevin Mitnick, William-L Simon, Daniel Garance, Raymond Debonne (ISBN: ) from Amazon’s Book Store. Buy L’art de la supercherie by Kevin Mitnick, William-L Simon, Steve Wozniak, Daniel Garance, Raymond Debonne (ISBN: ) from Amazon’s.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The world’s most infamous hacker offers an insider’s view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security Kevin Mitnick’s exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries.

Since his release from federal prison, inMitnick has turned his life around and The world’s most infamous hacker offers an insider’s view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security Kevin Mitnick’s exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries. Since his release from federal prison, inMitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide.

Now, in The Art of Deception, the world’s most notorious hacker gives new meaning to the old adage, “It takes a thief to catch a thief. With the help of many fascinating true stories of successful attacks on business and government, he illustrates just how susceptible even the most locked-down information systems are to a slick con artist impersonating an IRS agent.

Narrating from the points of view of both the attacker and the victims, he explains why each attack was so successful and how it could have been prevented in an engaging and highly readable style reminiscent of a true-crime novel.

And, perhaps most importantly, Mitnick offers advice for preventing these types of social engineering hacks through security protocols, training programs, and manuals that address the human element of security. Published by CampusPress: Pearson education France first published January 1st To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about L’art De La Supercherieplease sign up. I haven’t read this book yet but am considering borrowing it.

Are the stories in it actually based on real-world incidents, or are they purely hypothetical examples of security incidents that may not be feasible in the real world?

James Bore Anonymised to a degree, but very much real world. See 1 question about L’art De La Supercherie…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Um bom livro sobre aquele hacking moleque, aquele hacking arte, que era muito praticado antigamente. View all 3 comments. I suspect that if you’re reading for entertainment, then you probably want Mitnick’s The Art of Intrusion or Ghost in the Wires instead.

The guide, like all such specifications, is deadly dry and would require several readings and much thought to fully internalize.

Autumn Smith — L’art De La Supercherie [French] by Kevin Mitnick,

The anecdotes are more interesting than entertaining, and all proceed by the same b I suspect that if you’re reading for entertainment, then you probably want Mitnick’s The Art of Intrusion or Ghost in the Wires instead. The anecdotes are more interesting than entertaining, and all proceed by the same basic pattern: Sections directly relating to computer penetration are substantially less interesting than those that are merely two people on a phone. Mitnick’s focus is organizational, not individual, and presupposes an organized, collective effort towards protection based on establishing correct procedure, education, and most of all the directed effort of those in charge.

As such I can’t help but think that this book is targeted to executives and not to the peon-types on the front lines, who in the anecdotes are the ones who inadvertently give away the keys to the kingdom. Social engineering has been going on a long time and has impacted many corporations, governments, etc.

I felt this book did a great job documenting examples of what has taken place as well as provided insights for what you and your organization can do to help prevent, the best that you can, social engineering attacks.

This book definitely irritated me as I had not thought about the detailed level of attacks folks have gone through. Thinking back, there have probably been So Thinking back, there have probably been some times where I had been the person on the receiving end.

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Wish I had read this about a decade ago as it has some good common sense knowledge to learn from. Social engineering is the term used in computer security to describe the manipulation of humans in order to break through a security barrier, and is sometimes referred to as hacking the mind. In the first chapter of his book, usually referred to as The Lost Chapter As it wasn’t published with the final version of the bookKevin Mitnick tries to convince his readers that he is innocent — or at least In The Art of Deception[Kevin Mitnick] discusses the thing he’s best at: In the first chapter of his book, usually referred to as The Lost Chapter As it wasn’t published with the final version of the bookKevin Mitnick tries to convince his readers that he is innocent — or at least that he isn’t a “criminal”.

I believe he made good points in this chapter, and wish it was published. The book isn’t about Mitnick, though; it’s about social engineering. If he was ever on the dark side, he is no longer there. He now works as a security consultant, and this book is designed to help improve security awareness, and help us all avoid being deceived by social engineers. The bulk of this book consists of different stories of social engineers getting their job done, followed by advice on how to avoid such kinds of attacks.

Just like any security book, this book can also help the bad guys improve their skills, because it offers many ideas on how you can trick people; however, if the good guys read the book, they would laugh at the bad guys’ attempts and say “Ha, I know that one!

The idea of the book is very interesting, and some of its stories are really smart; however, I must admit that it gets a bit repetitive towards the end. The authors are trying to separate different stories into different chapters, but the differences between the ideas in these stories are sometimes so small.

L’art De La Supercherie

The ideas represented in this book are applicable to more than just computer-related systems Hey, you don’t have to use them to steal money, but they’re good to know anyway!

But anyway, as long as supercherrie use a computer, you’ll most likely be fine reading it! The authors have just completed a new book, The Art of Intrusion.

It looks like it is going to be more technical, and more geared toward hacking than social engineering. I probably will give it a try sometime. Almost all of this book consists of infinitesimal variations on the same point, communicated through accounts of apparently real events fictionalised by someone who clearly desperately wanted to write short stories instead of ghost-writing for minor celebrities but couldn’t find a publisher for them.

That every story reads mitnic, a att and I mean bad noir film isn’t just annoying; it makes mitnicj much less credible. It’s clear that Mitnick thinks very highly of himself and his accomplishments, occa Almost all of this book consists of infinitesimal variations on the same point, communicated through accounts of apparently real events fictionalised by someone who clearly desperately wanted to write short stories instead of ghost-writing for minor celebrities but couldn’t find a publisher for them.

It’s clear that Mitnick thinks very highly of himself and his accomplishments, occasionally remembering to point out that it’s really easy to defend against social engineering attacks but mostly painting social engineers as omnipotent Supermen who are just better than the common folk who merely work in offices; he also seems to think he’s the first person to write a book about defending against these con men, judging by his two chapters of condescending policy recommendations.

Maybe he is, to a lot of the people who’d read this book. It’s certainly likely that The Art of Deception has done and will continue to do more good than harm, which is more than can be said for most popular books on any kind of security. That doesn’t make it any less repetitive, though. I found the most valuable sections in this book to be the policy recommendations and information security practices described in the last chapters despite their age.

I’ll probably buy this book simply because of the security policy information and the easy-to-understand business cases that are easily comprehendible due to their storylike nature. This one had been sitting on my shelf for a loooong time.

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As a nerdy kid growing up I was fascinated by computers and the then-emerging Internet. I remember stumbling onto the “Anarchist Cookbook”, and finding a few issues of the hacker magazine at ar Barnes and Noble.

The checkout lady gave me a concerned frown and told me to be dd. Haha, joke was on her! I had no idea what I was reading.

Hacker’s Box : L’Art de la supercherie / Hacker’s Guide

Except for the parts about Kevin Mitnick, This one had been sitting on my shelf for a loooong time. Except for the parts dde Kevin Mitnick, the world’s greatest hacker. There was apparently some big “Free Kevin!

Except he never hurt anyone or truly damaged or broke anything, he just got caught having fun digitally trespassing. The day came when he was finally released from prison, and I remember gleefully watching him on ZNet TV on an episode of the Screensaver’s being allowed to access the Internet for the first time.

This was the ultimate “We did it Reddit! When I recently had to take an online training class at work about social engineers trying to trick you into giving up valuable proprietary information, there were cute little video segments featuring my old friend Kevin.

I changed my AIM status to support you! Oh wait, I bought your first book when it came out and I never read it! I regret that I did not l it then. While a lot of the information it provides is still quite valuable and true, it’s almost commonplace in any workplace setting these days. That’s not to say social engineers have given up and hung up their hats, it’s likely more prevalent than ever, but this is the Social Engineering book for people taking the on-ramp to the Information Superhighway supercheri the very first time in the early s.

It features advice in there like don’t keep your passwords written down next to locked computers there are a few X-Files episodes where Mulder and Scully can be thankful the monsters they were investigating didn’t read this bookmake those passwords a little more secure by being longer than 8 characters, don’t let someone convince you to attach a dial-up modem to your computer or network, and don’t set your modem to auto-answer nitnick a bored Matthew Broderick finds it.

The main point behind this book is still very true today: It doesn’t matter how sophisticated your technologically amazing security systems are, gullible super-friendly happy-to-help human beings are always your weakest link. I’m convinced that if the Chinese have any engineering blueprints al our latest warfighters, they probably got it from having a young-looking spy with a goofy grin pretend to need help writing a book report.

But it’s less embarrassing to blame faceless hackers. The best parts of the book were the little story vignettes that demonstrated how a person can make a supercheerie seemingly innocent phone supercheroe asking for tidbits of kevln that lead to the mother-load. The first call could be person pretending to be a customer needing some advice.

The next phone call could be to the receptionist with that little bit of gained knowledge to sound like an employee at another location. That receptionist will provide information that a manager could use, and suddenly Gary in accounting needs to send over the latest financial projections STAT.

Fax would work best, e-mail has been spercherie weird. I especially enjoyed the story about how young Kevin and a friend of his in high school went to a tech convention and managed to thwart a super-secure system in development. Not kevn hacking so much as waiting for supercheri employees supercnerie all leave the system un-attended during lunch, sweet-talking a promoter, using slight of hand and lock-picking a cabinet, and switching around some network cables.

Kind of silly to build the vault door out of titanium if the surrounding walls are made from cardboard. The last chunk of the book is just lists and simple paragraphs of kind of boring now-cliche advice that those working in security should know by heart. It becomes an undergrad textbook, basically. I say all of this but find myself wanting to read the other books Kevin’s since published as I’m sure he’s got a wealth of ideas and knowledge about what social engineers might be up to today.

And it’s when you don’t think you can be fooled is when you are most likely to be.